Mountain View, Hawaii 96771
(808) 315-3503
high@himountaincoffee.com

High Mountain Kona Coffee Grounds

100% Kona Coffee Hand-Picked with care on Our High Mountain Kona Estate.

Premium Ground Kona Coffee!

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Kona Coffee Grinding Tips

Grinding wonderful High Mountain Estate coffee is not a secret. By considering the these five items you can turn you kitchen into a true Kona café where you are the star barista.

“The Grind” describes the actual size of individual ground Kona coffee particles as a whole. The very coarse grinds will deliver variations on a tea like coffee flavor (smooth and mild). On a sliding scale as the grind is finer so becomes your brew’s strength to the point where it can be bitter. To avoid some of the bitterness never let your ground Kona coffee drain completely as the last drips are bitter.

Fresh Ground Kona Coffee

To ensure that your Kona coffee is fresh, always buy Kona directly from the Hawaiian grower/roaster. To ensure that it stays fresh, always store your coffee in an airtight container. Good coffee is always ground fresh although your neighbor may have told you it is a good idea to pre-grind and freeze your coffee, there is no good reason to do this. By freezing your coffee you are changing it’s molecular structure and further opening up the possibility of moisture ruining your grounds. If your coffee grounds are already frozen, or someone in your family insists on freezing the ground coffee, be sure to let the coffee grounds warm up to room temperature before brewing.

Water used to Brew makes all the Difference!

Because the coffee extraction process is 98% water, it stands to reason, good H2O makes great Kona coffee. Whenever possible, use a mountain spring for best results. Filtered or bottled H2O can be an alternative when necessary. Whether you are brewing your favorite French Roast in your neck of the woods, or on your annual vacation, it is important that you use good, clean water. Well-water can have excess Iron and/or other particulates which can taint the taste of the grind. If you live in the city, your municipal tap may be excessively treated and that may alter the brew flavor. To ensure consistently good results, buy a jug of bottled or use filtered water as a minimum standard.

Measure and Grind 2 Tablespoons of Kona Coffee

Never skimp on coffee grounds. Use two (medium-coarse ground) heaping spoonful of Kona coffee grounds for each cup you are brewing. Be sure to measure and adjust the Kona to your liking as one table may be to your favor. While exact measurements are needed to make a cheese cake, exact measurements when making good coffee are a little impractical. Not too many of us want to get out the trusty measuring spoons or cup at 6:30 in the morning. Follow this simple rule of thumb. Grab a standard kitchen tablespoon and use two spoonful of Kona coffee grounds for each cup of Kona you intend to make. After using the two spoon method, adjust to your liking. If you like it stronger, use two or more spoonfuls per cup of Kona coffee grounds.

Running a Clean Kona Coffee Machine

Keep coffee equipment spotlessly clean. Take a break and clean your Kona brewing equipment every few weeks minimum. If your ground coffee is not tasting up to snuff, and you have diligently followed the tips above, perhaps you simply have a dirty brewer. Part of what makes Kona specialty coffee taste so good are the oils that are extracted during the Kona brewing process. While desirable in the cup, these oils from the coffee grinds will over time seep into the plastic components of your brewer. The trapped oils then become rancid and leave a not-so-wonderful taste in every pot thereafter.

Try running a few pots of water through your machine with two spoonfuls of baking soda mixed in per pot. Then run two pots of plain water through the brewer to eliminate the baking soda . If this does not solve the problem, it may be time to purchase a new brewer. The typical home brewer will last about 4-5 years.

High Mountain Kona Coffee Growers